Dragon Boat World Athlete: Are you too young to start Paddling?

This Q&A was with Dragon Boat World Athlete, Paul Alex Kandler, National Athlete – Team Germany.

Dragon Boat World Athlete Paul Alex Kandler

DRAGON BOAT WORLD ATHLETE PROFILE

NAME: Paul Alex Kandler
BIRTHPLACE: Neustrelitz, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Germany
AGE: 20yo
TRAINING COMMITMENT: Part-time
POSITION: Paddler (Occasional Pacer/Schlagmann)
PADDLING SIDE: Right
HEIGHT: 186cm
WEIGHT: 85kg
STATUS: Single

MEDAL RECORD:
German Championships 2014, Schwerin, Bronze – Mixed, Standard Boat, 500m
9th IDBF Dragon Boat Club Crew World Championships, Ravenna, Bronze – Mixed, Small Boat, 500m (Uckermark U18)
Vize European Master 2014, Silver – Mixed, Standard Boat, 2000m
Vize European Master 2014, 2 Bronzes – Mixed, Standard Boat, 2000m, 500m
Vize European Master 2014, Bronze – Open, Small Boat, 200m
11th EDBF European Dragon Boat Nations Championships, Racice, Bronze – U18, Small Boat, 200m
Vize Weltmeister 2015, 2 Silvers – Open, Small Boat, 2000m, 500m
IDBF World Dragon Boat Racing Championships 2015, Welland, 2 Silvers; 1 BronzeOpen, Small Boat; U24 Small Boat, 200m

Dragon Boat World Athlete Paul Alex Kandler


It’s beneficial to become athletic at a young age. Though it’s not set in stone as to what age is ‘too young’ for one to start, it certainly helps to be exposed to sports early–it keeps the body active and it also helps improve self-esteem and physical health. Experts say that athletes tend to develop their mental abilities better than non-athletes.

According to results of a study by Jocelyn Faubert, “It is clear that a remarkable mental processing and learning abilities should be acknowledged as critical elements for world-class performance in sport and potentially elite performance abilities in other dynamic contexts¹.”

Dragon Boat World Athlete Paul Alex Kandler

While it doesn’t matter what kind of sport you’re leaning to focus on, starting young gives you more room for discovery and finding your true passion. Just like our next featured Dragon Boat World Athlete, 20 year old, Paul Alex Kandler from Germany.

As a kid, Paul grew up to be fond of any kinds of sports. He played football for several years until the time came when he found his passion in water sports–Stand Up Paddling (SUP), Outrigger Canoeing (OC) and Dragon Boat. He was introduced to the Dragon Boat world through his school team, Carolinum Dragons, and from there he had fallen deep under the ‘spell of the dragon’.

Dragon Boat World Athlete Paul Alex Kandler

From his school team in 2013, he joined a local competitive club called: Strelitz Dragons. That’s where he became more and more serious with the sport. He began to join large-scale dragon boat competitions and have clinched several medals with his home team. From then on he was determined to enhance his paddling skills and join major races like the Nationals, Continental and Worlds. He’s been competing for four years now and at his young age, he’s had shown exceptional potential to arise in Premiere level in the near future.

So for those of you who started paddling in your teens like Paul, keep doing what you’re doing and if you aspire to one day represent your country in the World Championships, the right time to start working for it is now. Let’s read on Paul’s experience being with the National Team and what’s the best lesson he has learned from it.

Dragon Boat World Athlete Paul Alex Kandler
Dragon Boat World Athlete Paul Alex Kandler


Q: Who was your first coach in dragon boat? Who was your first coach in Outrigger Canoe (OC)?

A:My first dragon boat coach was my PE teacher Mr Pfitzner. Now my coaches are from the National Team. In OC, I’m my own coach.

Q: How long have you been with Team Germany? How is the experience so far?

A: I have paddled with the National Team for three years now and can only say that we (athletes) have no fear. Having said this, one just needs to believe in himself that he can do it. The National Team is very sociable and accepting of everyone who has the passion. In the training camp, the athletes give their best to master the training programme. It’s like everyone is racing against themselves. Although the training programme gets intense by the day, no matter what level or age group you are in, with the right workout there is no problem.

Dragon Boat World Athlete Paul Alex Kandler
Dragon Boat World Athlete Paul Alex Kandler

Q: Will you be representing Team Germany in the upcoming EDBF Championships in June?

A: Yes. I trained hard to be selected and only recently I got the news from our trainer that I got in and I must be there to help the crew.

Q: How are the preparations for the European Championships in June in Rome, Italy?

A: The preparations run according to the training plan that the coach have designed. We have to fulfill it as planned and we have to attend the regular training camps in order for us to have achieve a common goal of having a strong, solid boat.

Q: We understand that aside from Dragon Boat, you also do Outrigger Canoe (OC), how does it benefit your paddling in Dragon Boat?

A: OC is a good alternative when I’m not training with my drachenboot (dragon boat) team. It’s also a great balancing workout so that you can paddle both sides and this is very good for the body.

Dragon Boat World Athlete Paul Alex Kandler

Q: How do you manage your time between dragon boat and OC? Can you share with us the similarities and differences of these two water sports in terms of paddling stroke? Does the stroke sometimes become confusing?

A: I manage it very well. Since dragon boat is a team sport, everyone needs to be there for training unlike in OC, when my team is not available to practice together, I do OC on my own. As for the force required, OC is more difficult because the OC paddle has a larger blade but paddling technique wise, for me it’s very similar. The confusion in the stroke is minimal. You just have to focus on which boat you are paddling in.

Q: As a National Athlete, what is the best lesson you’ve learned so far from the sport of dragon boat?

A: The best lesson I have learned is to not have fear of learning new techniques and strategies for the good of the team. Dragon boat is not just for one person, if everyone is training hard, it’s the team that gets better.


Reference

1. Jocelyn Faubert, “Professional athletes have extraordinary skills for rapidly learning complex and neutral dynamic visual scenes”, Nature.com, 31st January 2013, Nature Publishing Group, 24th May 2016

 
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Paddles & Microphones | Q&A: Mathilda D’silva Speaks to Eugephemisms

Mathilda D’silva is a former Singapore Idol finalist in the television franchise’s first season. She is known in the dragon boating/outrigger canoeing community, not just a paddler but as a songstress as well. Let’s get to know more about her paddling life, her story post Idol and what she thinks of the current state of the local music scene and the struggle of artists.

SINGapura

 Q: Where did you grow up? Was music a big role in your growing up years?

Mathilda: I’m actually a first generation Singaporean-born and bred here. Growing up was about listening to cassette tapes of the Carpenters (Karen Carpenter is the reason why I learnt to play the drums), Gladys Knight, ABBA… Apparently as a baby I would wake up and dance to the 70’s show Solid Gold…and loved commercials. Guess that’s why I worked in TV and Radio later on.

Q: What/Who influenced your musicality?

M: There an old cassette tape recorded by my father of me as a child being “interviewed” and singing my top hits like Twinkle Twinkle and the McDonald’s commercial. I was obsessed with the radio, tried taking it apart to hear the little people singing in it…Obsessed with music on TV. Michael Jackson was a huge influence, but I listened to such a range of music from R&B to pop to funk to soul to rock, even metal when I was a teenager. Everything old school makes me happy.

Q: Mathilda is such a beautiful name. Were you named after someone famous or an Aunt perhaps?

M: So here’s the story, my family wanted to call me Sarah. I was born in the year where the Commonwealth Games were held in Australia and the mascot was a giant boxing Kangaroo called Matilda. So…there was a bit of a tussle between Sarah and Matilda, the PR blitz won out and that’s where the name came. My mom’s boss was French, and his wife Mathilde was the one who suggested to put the “H” in Mathilda.

Q: We are happy to know that you have continued your passion in music up to this day. If we may borrow a line from James Ingram’s hit, “How do you keep the music playing?”

M: I’m so lucky to be surrounded by great musicians and event organisers such as Crazy Elephant, Highnotes Music, Jordan Wei, Esplanade and loads more who keep calling me for gigs. My rock band Dirty Dealers keeps the fun element of what I do while my R&B, jazz and funk outfits help me to articulate my feelings…and I got a lot of those!

Q: Do you have any regular gig at the moment? Where and which night can we catch you there?

M: I alternately do two Thursdays in a month with the Dirty Dealers at Crazy Elephant. So if you love blues rock and metal, that’s for you. I’ve got a massive event happening at the Esplanade on the 6th December. More details HERE.

Q: Which venue in Singapore is your most ‘favourite stage’ to perform? Why so?

M: There’s a line in “Song For You”– I’ve acted out my life in stages, with 10,000 people watching. I love singing that song because its really my life. I have a soft spot for the Mediacorp TV Theatre, we are shifting soon but that was where Singapore Idol was filmed and my career in the industry took off from there. Sometimes during lunch time I’d sit in the empty studio as the staging hands set up for other shows and I recall those moments on TV. This year I managed to reprise the stage again…with an audience full of British Dragons, German Dragons and American Dragons Outrigger folks cheering me on!

Q: On a scale of 1-10, can you rate the current struggle of local artists? (1 being the toughest) How difficult is it now to produce a ‘local’ album given the popularity of American pop music and K-Pop to Singaporeans?

M: I’d say, 5 over 10; but before Social Media, it was just 1. Nowadays, if artistes want to be popular, they have to put in the leg work. Even with all my connections on radio, TV and the recording industry, I can honestly say it’s tough. It’s tough everywhere for musicians to become a huge hit because the massive financial marketing machine of A&R (Artists and Repertoir Departments) doesn’t exist anymore. In fact, I gave my first album away because I wasn’t interested in getting into the CD sales game. I’ve always said, live performances is where it’s at. Music is about winning hearts, one person at a time, local or otherwise.

Mathilda D'silva

Q: Do you want to share your fearless personal view of what needs to be done?

M: I work to fund my musical ideas. A famous judge on Singapore Idol told me that my voice was common, Singapore wasn’t interested in another Indian woman singing R&B, it would be boring blah blah blah. One half of me is really sensitive about being shot down constantly- that’s what happens in reality TV land where your face is in the New Paper every week, fashion stylists who went on air to ridicule my clothes and hair…Thankfully the other half of me says “I don’t care what you think” but with a few more cuss words in there. I’ve sung for kings and for the strangers in the street. Whatever I wanted to do, I just go out and do it. Sitting and waiting for someone to deem me worthy for a chance isn’t my style.  That’s the dragon boater in me, focus up to the finish line and then Charge!

Paddling Life

Q: When did you start Dragon boating/Outrigger canoeing?

M: I started getting into dragon boat end of 2009, stepping into the Glory days of the German Dragons Singapore (GDS) and stayed for a few years with the team. I never had a coach in my life who cared so much about my improvement, or teammates who I love so intensely despite them having left Singapore. So many memories of races, people are who I miss most. I moved from a paddler into GDS Exco as Team Affairs, leading an amazing marketing team to create some of the best and most memorable GDS parties in the history of expat dragon boating. I miss that crazy crew.

Just started Outrigger Canoe (OC) last year with the American Dragons and taught by one of the great American Dragons Captains, Tharin Walker, who laughed at my swimming abilities (which are low to none). 6 years on and I’m still in love with paddling.

Q: What benefits do you get from each sport?

M: Dragon boating is painful and tough. It will make every joint ache and then some. But the teamwork that you get from that sport is just irreplaceable. OC is a thinking paddler’s sport…I guess that’s where the older dragon boaters go out to pasture. It’s amazing and crazy though, open ocean, long distances, 6 people battling against mother nature. I’m still in awe.

Q: We understand that you are quite committed in your full-time job as Producer/Social Media Manager at MediaCorp. Do you paddle for leisure or competitive? How often do you go for training nowadays?

M: Sometimes I’m so tired I can’t stand. Between my work in TV, social media, music, paddling and everything else I do…I can’t breathe. But it’s a great life I have with amazing friends in it. I do what I love, how many people can say that?

Q: How long have you been paddling? Being involved in the paddling community for a number of years now, in your opinion, how did it evolved since?

M: Dragon boat has become a fully organised machine where expat teams are so elevated sports-wise with National Coaches, endurance training on more days…It’s hard to have an edge and keep it. The sport has also been losing a lot of the old guard, my good friends from all the different teams…some who helped to set up the teams in the first place. There’s so much history between all the expat teams, I’d hate to see those epic moments disappearing. One thing I’m proud of…is the segment now within Dragon Divas Race called the Breast Cancer Awareness race that I proposed as part of Anne and Melanie’s long running successful Dragon Divas event. With Anne’s recovery from cancer and my mother’s 4 time cancer bout…I am so glad to see this tradition of paddling with survivors still continues today.

Every single person, even the weirdos or the social butterflies who paddle to get dates…everyone has a place in the team.

Q: In terms of participation, are both sports moving into progression or are we looking at the same things as what we have had, say, three years ago?

M: I know I’m going to get into trouble for saying this but let’s be completely honest about this OC-Dragon Boat poaching business. For many years because I was in EXCO I was against my team members doing OC for fear of losing them. Just as it works in a romantic relationship, people stay when they feel a need to stay. I don’t think banning dragon boaters will prevent them from doing OC. Expat team dragon boaters and like wild horses, they will gallop where they please. Which is why I am very supportive of teams such as AustCham and American Dragons having their own OC chapter. It’s hard to have OC and Dragon Boat offered in one team because of logistics; but it’s a good way to keep your  people.

Q: Tell us about your experience as a former EXCO of your team. What was your formula of keeping the fun and the team together?

M: As a former Team Affairs head of German Dragons Singapore who looks after everything from: Inter-team relations, Events, Marketing, Sponsorship, International Dragon Boat Community Representative, Boracay Race Representative, Newbies, Merchandise, Social Media and Website–this is a full time job and that’s not for someone who’s looking to be Mr/Miss Popular. This is a job for a leader who has no problem getting into the trenches and inspiring a management team to create a “feeling of belongingness” to everyone in a team. I’m so blessed that I had amazing teammates whom I’ve worked with in my tenure…from my BBQ Master to my Party B*tch, they got pushed harder (even harder than an A-boat in Singapore River Regatta) and delivered. Always get the right people for the right roles. Every single person, even the weirdos or the social butterflies who paddle to get dates…everyone has a place in the team. Give people a sense of belongingness and utilise all your soft skills to make them feel welcomed.


Enjoy a romantic musical afternoon with Mathilda D’silva, on 6th December, 3pm at the Esplanade. It’s a 1,000-seater venue, so no worries about the seating setup. Come one, come all. Admission is absolutely FREE!

Sing-along: Evergreen Favourites with Mathilda D’Silva
Venue: Esplanade Concert Hall
Date: 6 December 2015 (Sunday)
Time: 3pm – 4.15pm (75 minutes)

More information about Esplanade’s Featured Musicians.
 
*This interview has been edited and condensed
Photo Credit: Mathilda D’silva’s Facebook Page